Charles 1st and a very small coffin.

It isn’t every day I find an intriguing little snippet, but today was one of those days. This article tells the tale of the finding and opening of Charles I’s Screenshot 2015-01-30 15.37.09

coffin- fascinating in itself, especially as it was found in vault considered to contain the coffins of

Screenshot 2015-01-30 15.37.46 Screenshot 2015-01-30 15.38.19

Henry VIII and Jane Seymour,though the coffins thought to be their’s are not inscribed as such.

Charles I’s though does have an inscription and when opened the facial features relate to portraits of him, and the head was clearly severed, execution-style. So no reason to doubt it’s provenance.

But for me the part that really intrigues is the mention of a small coffin placed on top of Charles’ pall, covered in crimson velvet. A child clearly, but who?

The suggestion that it was a stillborn child of Queen Anne, (Charles I’s mother) while she was a Princess in Denmark seems, in my opinion, Screenshot 2015-01-30 15.45.31
preposterous.

1) She required to be a virgin when James VI married her and there has never been any suggestion that she wasn’t.
2) Why would the coffin of a child likely born many years earlier have been kept and re-buried along with Charles I?
3) (Most intriguing of all) Why would this be suggested?

If anyone can shed light on this for me, or point me in the direction of further information I’d be grateful – little snippets like this can be very useful, but they can also be VERY distracting…

Happy birthday!

Here’s a story to inspire beginning writers to work hard and stick at it. Success IS possible.

STEVEN A. McKAY

Today is exactly one year since my debut novel, Wolf’s Head, was published.

Wolfs-Head_ebook-FrontCover

I had no idea what to expect – I was simply hoping to make a few sales and begin to make a name for myself that I could build on during the coming years.

Well, things have gone much better than I could ever have hoped, with both Wolf’s Head and the sequel The Wolf and the Raven hitting Amazon’s “War” chart number 1 spot, with the first novel even making it onto the overall Top 20 bestseller list!

Wolf and Raven ebook cover final

I’ve had an audiobook produced, been invited down to the capital by Amazon KDP for the London Book Fair (as well as being feautured on the front page of Amazon.co.uk), contributed articles to the Writers and Artists Yearbook website and, just last night, started work on a novella which will sit outside the main Forest Lord series and…

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The Life of Lady Katherine Gordon

Here is a fascinating historical character – tempting to investigate, but must stick to my own period and the Munros just now!

The Freelance History Writer

Woman in 16th Century Scottish dress (http://www.gutenberg.org/files/34845/34845-h/34845-h.htm) Woman in 16th Century Scottish dress (http://www.gutenberg.org/files/34845/34845-h/34845-h.htm)

By all accounts, Lady Katherine Gordon was a beautiful woman. She was the daughter of a Scottish nobleman with royal connections and married four times, including to the pretender to the English throne, Perkin Warbeck. She was a witness to many important events in Tudor history.

Katherine was born c. 1474, the daughter of George Gordon, 2nd Earl of Huntly and his third wife, Elizabeth Hay, who was the daughter of the 1st Earl of Errol. Katherine was the great-granddaughter of King James I and therefore of royal blood. She most likely spent time at the Scottish court in her youth and received an education worthy of her rank. She may or may not have heard rumors and reports about the war being fought over the English throne.

In July of 1495, a young man arrived at the Scottish court of King James…

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Long Exposure Beach Photography in Australia

I do so miss living beside the sea – I miss watching its ever-changing moods

Julie Green Art & Photography

Beach Landscape Long Exposure

“All matter, including you and I, has rhythmic movement within it and our quest should be to create a proper rhythmic harmony within ourselves… you feel happy when you sit near an ocean because your vibrations try to synchronize with the frequency of the waves.” 

― Ed Viswanathan

Contemplation at the Shoreline

I think this guy was just as in awe of the place as I was.

Blurred swimmers in actionThe expanseBeautiful swimmer with oceanGorgeous sunset

“The sea is emotion incarnate. It loves, hates, and weeps. It defies all attempts to capture it with words and rejects all shackles. No matter what you say about it, there is always that which you can’t.” 
― Christopher Paolini

Fluffy wavesSwimming at the beach poolGlassy water at sunsetPhotographer kicking the water during a beautiful sunset

“Because there’s nothing more beautiful than the way the ocean refuses to stop kissing the shoreline, no matter how many times it’s sent away.” 
― Sarah Kay

Sunset Photography at the Beach

It’s not often you see beach photography on my page, but I’m excited to be sharing my first attempts at fluffy waves (long…

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Accuracy or Authenticity?

Anywhere near Edinburgh?

Heard about the ‘Previously’ Scotland’s History Festival?

274 events / 18 days / 5000 years of history.

I am excited to be running a 1 1/2 hour workshop on Writing Authentic Historical Fiction as part of this festival. (And hoping for a really good time!)

5:45pm Monday 18th November

Writing Authentic Historical Fiction. – Why the Devil is in the Detail.
Adam House, Chambers Street Edinburgh EH1 1HT

A writer’s workshop looking at topics such as –

Does authenticity = accuracy?
When accuracy gets in the way of the story.
Historical background – Can there be overload?
How important is detail?
How serious are anachronisms?

Join Margaret Skea, an award-winning short story writer and historical novelist, (author of the prize-winning novel Turn of the Tide) to examine the practicalities of writing convincing historical fiction.
£10.00 / £9.00 Book online at http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/event/9165667759/es2?rank=1&sid=89e87211460111e3acf012313913b211

Accuracy or Authenticity?

5:45pm Monday 18th November

Writing Authentic Historical Fiction. – Why the Devil is in the Detail.
Adam House, Chambers Street Edinburgh EH1 1HT

A writer’s workshop looking at topics such as –

Does authenticity = accuracy?
When accuracy gets in the way of the story.
Historical background – Can there be overload?
How important is detail?
How serious are anachronisms?

Join Margaret Skea, an award-winning short story writer and historical novelist, (author of the prize-winning novel Turn of the Tide) to examine the practicalities of writing convincing historical fiction.
£10.00 / £9.00 Book online at http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/event/9165667759/es2?rank=1&sid=89e87211460111e3acf012313913b211

Why historians should write fiction

A really interesting article by a well respected historian and novelist. One to bookmark and come back to read again.

Novel approaches

ARTICLE

 Ian Mortimer

“Your book reads like a novel,” is a comment that popular historians often hear. When said by a general reader, it is a compliment: an acknowledgement of the fluency of the writing and a compelling story. If a historian uses those same words, however, it is an insult. It means ‘you cannot be trusted on your facts’. Hence the title of this piece is bound to infuriate every reader of this journal, for it implies that historians should tell lies. After all, that is what novelists do, isn’t it? Make it all up if they don’t know the facts?

I ought to explain at the outset that I am a novelist (James Forrester) as well as a historian (Ian Mortimer), and I write history for the mass market as well as scholarly articles. As a novelist, I tell lies. Whoppers. All historical novelists do. In my…

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